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how does the sound travel through the ear

how does the sound travel through the ear插图

As sound waves enter the ear,they travel through the outer ear,the external auditory canal,and strike the eardrumcausing it to vibrate. The central part of the eardrum is connected to a small bone of the middle ear called the malleus (hammer).

What is the path that sound takes through the ear?

The sound waves travel from the outer ear and in through the auditory canal, causing the eardrum, or tympanic membrane, to vibrate. This, in turn, causes the three small bones, known as the ossicles, or the hammer, the anvil and the stirrup, in the middle ear to move.

How is sound heard or processed through the ear?

The mechanism of hearing. Sound waves enter the outer ear and travel through the external auditory canal until they reach the tympanic membrane, causing the membrane and the attached chain of auditory ossicles to vibrate.

How does sound travel from an object to an ear?

The way sounds travel through air, solids or liquids. Now we know the way how we can hear sounds. When something vibrates, sound waves are made and they move the air around them and make the air vibrate. These air vibrations enter our ears which we hear as sound. 1) If you ring a bell, the bell vibrates and makes sound waves.

How does sound travel from the outer ear to the brain?

Overview. As sound waves enter the ear,they travel through the outer ear,the external auditory canal,and strike the eardrumcausing it to vibrate. The central part of the eardrum is connected to a small bone of the middle ear called the malleus (hammer). As the malleus vibrates,it transmits the sound vibrations to the other two small bones…

What causes the basilar membrane to vibrate?

The wave motion is transmitted to the endolymph inside the cochlear duct. As a result the basilar membrane vibrates, which causes the organ of Corti to move against the tectoral membrane, stimulating generation of nerve impulses to the brain.

Why is pitch important in basilar membrane?

Instead, pitch is distinguished because of the continuous changes that occur along the length of the basilar membrane, which increases in width and mass and decreases in stiffness from its base near the oval window to its apex. Each region of the membrane is most affected by a specific frequency of vibrations.

How does the brain determine the pitch of a tone?

The brain recognizes the place on the basilar membrane, and thus the pitch of the tone, by the particular group of nerve fibres activated. For the lower frequencies—up to about 3,000 hertz—the rate of stimulation is also an important indicator of pitch.

What is the hair cell at the base of the cochlea?

At the base of the hair cells is a network of cochlear nerve endings, which lead to the spiral ganglion of Corti in the modiolus of the cochlea. The spiral ganglion sends axons into the cochlear nerve.

How do vibrations reach the basal end of the membrane?

Vibrations reaching the basal end through the perilymph proceed along the membrane as traveling waves that attain their maximum amplitude at a distance corresponding to their frequency and then rapidly subside. The higher the frequency of the sound imposed, the shorter the distance the waves travel.

Why does the cochlear duct vibrate?

Normally only the cochlear fluids and the cochlear duct vibrate in response to alternating pressures at the oval window , because only the cochlea has the round window as a “relief valve.”. Within the cochlea the different frequencies of complex sounds are sorted out, or analyzed, and the physical energy of these sound vibrations is converted, …

Where are hair cells located?

The hair cells located in the organ of Corti transduce mechanical sound vibrations into nerve impulses. They are stimulated when the basilar membrane, on which the organ of Corti rests, vibrates. The hair cells are held in place by the reticular lamina, a rigid structure supported by the pillar cells, or rods of Corti, which are attached to the basilar fibres. At the base of the hair cells is a network of cochlear nerve endings, which lead to the spiral ganglion of Corti in the modiolus of the cochlea. The spiral ganglion sends axons into the cochlear nerve. At the top of the hair cell is a hair bundle containing stereocilia, or sensory hairs, that project upward into the tectorial membrane, which lies above the stereocilia in the cochlear duct. (The single kinocilium, which is found on the hair cells of the vestibular system, is not found on the receptor cells of the cochlea.) When the basilar membrane moves upward, the reticular lamina moves upward and inward; when the membrane moves downward, the reticular lamina moves downward and outward. The resultant shearing forces between the reticular lamina and the tectorial membrane displace or bend the longest of the stereocilia, exciting the nerve fibres at the base of the hair cells.

What causes the cochlea to ripple?

Once the vibrations cause the fluid inside the cochlea to ripple, a traveling wave forms along the basilar membrane. Hair cells—sensory cells sitting on top of the basilar membrane—ride the wave. Hair cells near the wide end of the snail-shaped cochlea detect higher-pitched sounds, such as an infant crying.

What is the membrane of the cochlea called?

An elastic partition runs from the beginning to the end of the cochlea, splitting it into an upper and lower part. This partition is called the basilar membrane because it serves as the base, or ground floor, on which key hearing structures sit.

What are the three bones that vibrate in the middle ear?

The eardrum vibrates from the incoming sound waves and sends these vibrations to three tiny bones in the middle ear. These bones are called the malleus, incus, and stapes . The bones in the middle ear amplify, or increase, the sound vibrations and send them to the cochlea, a snail-shaped structure filled with fluid, in the inner ear.

How does hearing work?

Hearing depends on a series of complex steps that change sound waves in the air into electrical signals. Our auditory nerve then carries these signals to the brain. Also available: Journey of Sound to the Brain, an animated video.

What happens when hair cells bend?

As the hair cells move up and down, microscopic hair-like projections (known as stereocilia) that perch on top of the hair cells bump against an overlying structure and bend. Bending causes pore-like channels, which are at the tips of the stereocilia, to open up.

Which nerve carries electrical signals to the brain?

The auditory nerve carries this electrical signal to the brain, which turns it into a sound that we recognize and understand.

What is the name of the video that follows sound waves as they pass through the ear canal?

The National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIDCD), which developed Noisy Planet, has produced a two-and-a-half-minute animated video, Journey of Sound to the Brain, that follows sound waves as they pass through the ear canal and are changed to electrical signals that our brains interpret and understand.

What is the purpose of the inner ear video?

The video teaches viewers about the parts of the inner ear and how each part helps us understand and communicate with the world around us. Perfect for viewing at home or in the classroom, the video can help you begin a conversation with your children or students about how our hearing works and why it’s so important that we protect it. …

Where was the video of the trumpet played?

The video premiered during a Noisy Planet presentation at Westbrook Elementary School, in Bethesda, Maryland, to a group of engaged fourth graders. After students acted out the sequence of events involved in hearing, they attentively watched the animated version of what they just acted out. The students laughed and danced in their seats to the sounds of the trumpet and other instruments, reporting that they liked the video and learned from it.

Who developed the Noisy Planet campaign?

Get the latest news and updates from the Noisy Planet campaign, developed by the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders.

Can you add videos to your watch history?

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How do sound waves travel?

Sound waves travel from the outer ear and in through the auditory canal, causing the eardrum to vibrate . This in turn causes three small bones in the middle ear to move. The vibrations move through the fluid in the cochlea in the inner ear, stimulating thousands of tiny hair cells. This results in the transformation of the vibrations …

What happens when a stone hits water?

When a stone hits water, ripples spread out from that point in circles. In exactly the same way, a sound source creates waves or pressure variations in the air. These pressure variations are perceived by the ear as sound. Sound levels are measured in decibels (dB).

What is the ability of the ear to capture sound?

The ear’s ability to capture sound. To fully understand what hearing loss is, and what effect it has, an understanding of the physical make-up of the ear, how it works and not least how it captures sound, is essential.

What are the three bones that make up the ossicles?

The ossicles are actually tiny bones — the smallest in the human body. The three bones are named after their shapes: the malleus (hammer), incus (anvil) and stapes (stirrup). The ossicles further amplify the sound.

What is the outer ear?

The Outer Ear. The auricle ( pinna) is the visible portion of the outer ear. It collects sound waves and channels them into the ear canal (external auditory meatus), where the sound is amplified. The sound waves then travel toward a flexible, oval membrane at the end of the ear canal called the eardrum, or tympanic membrane.

How many nerve endings are set into motion?

As the fluid moves, 25,000 nerve endings are set into motion. These nerve endings transform the vibrations into electrical impulses that then travel along the eighth cranial nerve (auditory nerve) to the brain. The brain then interprets these signals, and this is how we hear.

Which bone is responsible for equalizing the pressure between the air outside the ear and that within the middle ear?

The ossicles further amplify the sound. The tiny stapes bone attaches to the oval window that connects the middle ear to the inner ear. The Eustachian tube , which opens into the middle ear, is responsible for equalizing the pressure between the air outside the ear and that within the middle ear.

Which organ is responsible for balance?

The inner ear also contains the vestibular organ that is responsible for balance.